©2017 100 Homes Project

Mrs Parsons

We met Mrs Parsons at the 100 Homes Exhibition earlier this year; she was keen to share her story with us as many others were. She had very vivid memories of World War II. At the time she was a young woman living in Stonehouse…

 

“I remember the Palace Theatre and the plays, the theatre nights there and how there was a sweet shop run by Arthur Scoot nearby. How folks and servicemen would pop into buys sweets to take to the theatre… he also owned a large veg shop on Union Street…”

 

The big act then was the armed forces sweetheart Dorothy Scott, she played here many times throughout the War… and even when the bombs fell people went up to the hoe for dancing…

… The jewel in the crown was watching the Royal Marines Band marching through Union Street; everybody would come out to see them from the houses and shops. I loved the big drums best, with the massive loincloth over the drums; they looked so smart in their uniforms with the black shoes that just were so shining… people loved them!”

Mrs Parsons recalled for us a night in WWII:

 

I remember one night in April 1941 bombs fell on Stonehouse and it was hell on earth, houses We're on fire and buildings were collapsing. Our family was caught in this bombing…

I remember Uncle John who used to have a horse and cart selling milk and he came looking for us. Riding the cart down to where we lived; he had to move the bodies of people and soldiers out of the way, to get to near our house.

With our house on fire and people screaming the bunker under the building was not safe. An air raid warden and Uncle John came in to get everybody out…

I remember our house on fire, standing there watching it for a few minutes, till my mum saw Uncle John who was in tears and so happy to see us alive. He was a true hero that night risking his life getting us and others into another bomb shelter.

I still see today the bodies that were everywhere and the houses on fire. After that we moved to Emma Place and stayed the next day with Uncle John and his wife who took care of us, we lost everything in the bombing. I was 11 years old when this happened.

…One happy memory for me is eating chips they were made in lard and placed in newspapers and dead cheap back then and lovely to eat not like today's chips.”